Science Daily.com reports the conclusions of a recent study that suggests men are more confident and more likely to think they're wrong when given a boost of testosterone. Eleveated testosterone seems to also be a factor in impulsive decisions.

Joey and I were talking about the study on the air yesterday and after the conversation, we got a call from a listener who said a couple years ago that he couldn't figure out why he kept crying all the time. The doctor asked him if he drinks a lot of bottled water, which he did, working on a construction site. After testing his blood, the doctor realized that his estrogen levels were much higher than testosterone levels. The doctor said that the plastic water bottles tend to leach chemicals from the bottle into the water, which the doctor said was decreasing his testosterone levels. He says he quit drinking bottled water and gets testosterone boosters from the health food store. Healthline.com has some natural ways here to boost your 'T' count.

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has this to say about the chemicals around us (in a lot of common household products) that can affect everything from fertility to disease:

 

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that may interfere with the body’s endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects in both humans and wildlife. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and plasticizers such as bisphenol A. Endocrine disruptors may be found in many everyday products– including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. The NIEHS supports studies to determine whether exposure to endocrine disruptors may result in human health effects including lowered fertility and an increased incidence of endometriosis and some cancers. Research shows that endocrine disruptors may pose the greatest risk during prenatal and early postnatal development when organ and neural systems are forming.

After the testosterone conversation, I got an interesting email from a listener who is a Disabled Army Veteran 1985-1996 who said this:

"Interesting spot about the testosterone study. I have been getting the gel from the VA for over 5 years now. Of all the meds I currently get it is the only one that requires a signature since it is now a schedule III drug just like ketamine and Tylenol 3. Never had to sign when they gave me oxycodone in the late 90s then replaced with Vicodin then tramadol and now gabapentin. Waiting for gabapentin to fall out of favor just like the rest."

Testosterone affects more than just your sex drive - medicalnewstoday.com has a breakdown for you here.