I don't even want to start thinking about another cold and snowy winter. I'm still enjoying summer and all of the warm temperatures we've been dealing with.

If you're from Michigan, then you know what I mean when I say summers are too hot and winters are too cold here in our Great Lakes state.

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But like it or not, the Farmers' Almanac just released their latest prediction for our Great Lakes region.

How about another unreasonably cold and snowy winter in Michigan. And I say, why not? We're all use to it by now. It just a matter of wearing the warmest clothes possible and throwing a few extra blankets on the bed.

mlive.com with the latest:

The Almanac has released annual extended weather forecasts since 1818 to help people – particularly farmers – prepare. The overall prediction: the Almanac is expecting winter 2022-2023 to include “plenty of shaking, shivering and shoveling” throughout the United States.

You would think that people living in the Great Lakes area would be absolutely freezing during a very cold and snowy winter.

I've lived in Michigan all my life and have dealt with so many snowy and cold winters. I'm very use to all the shoveling, snow, very cold temperatures, extra salt on our Michigan roads, and getting my vehicle stuck in a few snow banks.

And talk about very cold temperatures, mlive.com adds:

However, the Great Lakes region won’t have it as bad as the North Central states, which are forecast to experience extreme cold during mid-January with possible temperatures of 40 degrees below zero.

In a perfect world, wouldn't it be great to live in Florida during the winter months and move back to Michigan in the spring and summer?

We still have several months left before we deal with old man winter again. Let him rest up so we can enjoy the rest of summer and fall.

LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.