This past weekend I went to the Owosso. My wife and I decided to visit the Owosso Farmer's Market while we were there. We love getting fresh produce and supporting local farmers.

What I didn't know. I'm new to the farmer's market scene and I did not know that there's so much more than just fresh produce and meat. There are arts and craft vendors, t-shirt vendors and we were even able to replace our key fob battery at the locksmith vendor at the farmer's market in Owosso. That saved us another stop and it was a nice surprise.

Another vendor that stood out to me was the worm vendor. These guys are featured in the picture above. They were a couple of nice fellas that took their worm farming seriously.

I became curious about worm farms. What are they? What do they do with the worms? Are the worm farms for fishing bait? I remember when I was a kid, some of my friends had worm farm kits that they built at home. I wasn't that lucky.

To help me understand what worm farming is, and what it is used for I had to understand the definition. According to Merriam-Webster the definition of worm farming, or the proper term "vermiculture" is:

the cultivation of annelid worms (such as earthworms or bloodworms) especially for use as bait or in composting

Worm farms are used for many reasons. You can use the worms for bait or for composting. If you are into fishing or composting perhaps a visit to these worm farm locations can educate you more about the process. You could pick up some worms for bait or for composting and have the best fishing experience and/or garden in town.

Worm Farms in Michigan

Learn more about vermiculture at these Michigan worm farms.

A vendor at a farmer's market in Owosso sparked my interest in worm farming. I learned more about it too. I think I am going to grow a garden now. Kids love worms. Take a road trip with the family to learn more about worms.

Nightsoilers