The band started out in 1969 as “The Reasons Why”, then in 1970 they became Kansas, merging with another progressive Kansas band White Clover, and as they say, the rest is history.

Kansas achieved much success in the 70’s with their unique style of Orchestral Rock. As most bands do they went through some personnel changes in the first couple years, but by 1973 they were solid and the show was on. Between 1974 and 1979 Kansas would reach National prominence. With the help of manager Don Kirshner Kansas formed a cult following.

Their initial self-titled album came out in 1974 and established their unique sound. Song for America came out in February 1975, followed by Masque in October of that year. The Leftoverture album showed up in 1976 providing Kansas with their first hit single, “Carry On Wayward Son”. In 1977 they released Point of Know Return, which featured their second hit single “Dust in The Wind”, solidifying them as a bonafide national act.

These albums all went platinum, signifying massive record sales. In 1979 their next album was Monolith. This one featured the single “People of The Southwind”, however this album did not do anywhere as good in sales or radio airplay as the previous two releases. It still eventually went platinum.

Creative differences at this point caused changes in personnel and different band members went their own way. But in 1985 the band reformed with some of the original members. They released the Power album in 1986. At this point Kansas became a touring band and still continues to tour to this day.

Current members of Kansas are:
Phil Ehart
Rich Williams
Billy Greer
David Ragsdale
Ronnie Platt
Tom Brislin

Kansas's original lineup as of 1973 was Steve Walsh, Robby Steinhardt, Kerry Livgren, Rich Williams, Dave Hope and Phil Ehart.

Kansas

Kansas

Still photos came from this YouTube video submitted by 1kansasfan

 

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